Eat Your Heart Out: Why the food business is bad for the planet and your health

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It's possible it could be good for menopausal women and older men as it may help protect against heart disease, osteoporosis, and breast and prostate cancers. Most are high in sugar. Weetabix and porridge are best. Standard milk.

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Standing on concrete for long periods, too heavy udders prone to mastitis requiring antibiotics and possibly causing infertility, and not enough space to lie down in. Consuming lots of low quality meat. Meat is an inefficient source of protein requiring a large amount of resources for small output, which due to intensive farming practices has been further devalued since the once lower fat white meat, like chicken, is now as fatty as red when the animals aren't free to exercise.

Neither are they free to eat their natural diet and are instead fed grain, lowering the nutritional value of their meat, eggs and dairy.

Also, cheap 'fresh' meat sometimes contains added sugar and water. I knew about the water, not the sugar. Why can't they be raised for beef? They're bred for high-producing dairy and give very little beef for the cost of resources to raise them - it doesn't make economic sense. It may also be months old by the time it hits supermarket shelves - they've found a way to halt the ripening process. The Future Future prospects for the food industry are going to be shaped by the rising oil prices, climate change, China and India's rapid growth and changing diets, obesity and related illness, the 'short-termism' of governments, and the raised awareness among consumers changing the way we shop, resulting in more protests and campaigns for change.

Yep, change is inevitable. Lawrence really hammers home the dangers of the current system one day leaving us all starving to death if we don't change what and how we grow, rear and sell our food. Whatever happens, know we'll most likely have to pay more for it, and so we should.

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Remember, you get what you pay for. Hopefully, that will mean nutritious food free from chemicals produced by people paid a decent wage to treat animals with care. View all 5 comments. Nov 15, Lucy rated it really liked it Shelves: , sustainability , non-fiction. This book was scary. I had, for example, no idea that many studies suggest soya milk to mess with your hormones and produce more oestrogen.

Nor did I realise that chicken now has so much fat it might not be any less fatty than red meat. I hate butter but nearly died when I read about how margerine is made. I think the book is well written and informative and it will This book was scary.

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I think the book is well written and informative and it will certainly make you question food choices not just for health reasons but also from environmental and socioeconomic reasons too the chapter on the polish immigrant workers was very good. The journalistic style and personal anecdotes made it very easy to read. I didnt give it the full 5 stars because at times it was so doom and gloomy despite the optomistic chapter at the end I actually had to put it down and walk away. I also think the Omnivores Dilemma which I am currently reading although not from a UK perspective is better.

I would utterly recommend this book to anyone, no need to be into nutrition, sustainability, agriculture, politics. If you've ever eaten anything this book will have something for you. View 1 comment. Jun 20, Xavier rated it really liked it. Eat your Heart Out by Felicity Lawrence is a book for every one especially for people who are more on fast foods and supermarkets. As Ms.

Lawrence says in her book, the company has to be somewhere cheap and bulky. The book made my decisions to go for organic foods, forthright and indubitable. And I am looking forward towards my own land of organic farming. Sep 07, Caitlin rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction-other. The book is spit up into chapters on specific foods, but within these chapters is more than just information on that particular item of food. Through references to other chapters, and a reitterence of the driving factors of problems, as mentioned in her previous book also. As might be expected, since the author has previously written a book on the sa Not on the Label: What Really Goes Into the Food on Your Plate Another interesting book that can really make you mad at how the food industry is run.

As might be expected, since the author has previously written a book on the same topic, more or less, it felt a little repetitive in places.

Eat Your Heart Out: Why the food business is bad for the planet and your health

This book, I feel, had a somewhat more global approach than the last. It's also interesting to read about how the past has led to the food system we have today. Jun 25, Jeff rated it really liked it.

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Very similar is tone to the Onivore's Dilemma but a little more concise and takes on the food industry by dividing it up into different foods but demonstrates the repeated links to companies selling cheap commodities based from subsidized surpluses that invade our food in surprising ways. Just like Onivore's Dilemma this book raises more questions and leaves the how to the reader.

For those thinking the only way out is to stop eating read In defense of Food which in my opinion is an instruction Very similar is tone to the Onivore's Dilemma but a little more concise and takes on the food industry by dividing it up into different foods but demonstrates the repeated links to companies selling cheap commodities based from subsidized surpluses that invade our food in surprising ways.

For those thinking the only way out is to stop eating read In defense of Food which in my opinion is an instruction manual for how to get away from the worst of what is happening to our so called food chain. Apr 02, Rachel Murphy rated it really liked it Shelves: food , non-fiction , An excellent book but so depressing. Having read Michael Pollan's descriptions of the American food industry I was hoping this book, from a British perspective, would show things were better here.

But no, it's just as bad. The chapter on pigs and the slavery of Eastern Europeans was particularly disturbing. Hopefully, the more journalists such as Felicity Laurence and Michael Pollen highlight what is going on in food production, the more likely we are to see change. Four stars rather than five a An excellent book but so depressing.

Four stars rather than five as I occasionally found her writing style a little clunky and in need of commas. Dec 18, Roy rated it really liked it.


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Quite hard work to chug through, not entirely due to the author but rather the subject itself which made for quite gloomy reading. Pick any food stuff, and it is apparently dominated by a handful of mega corporations which severe consequences for individuals and the environment. One gripe with the author was with the persistence of the argument that sugar alternatives are toxins despite the lack of any substantive evidence.

Also she needs to get real on the issue of subsistence farming. Its neve Quite hard work to chug through, not entirely due to the author but rather the subject itself which made for quite gloomy reading. Its never going to happen. Read chapter one at least, then never buy any Kellog's product ever again.

Oct 31, Gemma Williams rated it really liked it. A well written and informative look at the politics behind food production, outlining the impact of economics on diet, nutrition, agribusiness, animal welfare, immigration and migrant labour, environmental devastation and the abuses of a system that subsidises and protects the rich while devastating developing countries in the name of 'free trade'. Jan 08, Roane Swindon rated it it was amazing. This is an eye-opening and life-changing book on the food industry and how global corporations are controlling the food supply in ways that are unhealthy and unsustainable.

A must-read. Read my full review on my blog.